Tuesday, May 8, 2018

The Rogation Days, Mon, Tues & Wed 7,8,9 May 2018

My Friends,


The Rogation  Days were, in origin, the adaption of pagan custom to a Christian use. The pagan Romans used to hold a solemn procession of prayer for the safe growth of the corn crop each year. The greater Rogation or Litany on April the 25th is a survival of this. Later the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday after the fifth Sunday after Easter were set aside as the lesser Rogation days. Formerly these were all fast days and public processions were held during which the Litany of the Saints was chanted. Although they are no longer fast days, the liturgy still retains penitential aspect and stresses the need  we have to avert God's anger by humble prayer and sacrifice.


The Rogation Mass lacks the festive tone of Easter and emphasizes the efficacy of prayer in adverting God's anger and securing His blessings.


In the Epistle for the Rogation Mass from Saint James 5, the verses 16-20 we read all about the power of prayer. We, as Catholic Christians, we need to have a disciplined prayer life and if we do so then we will be blessed. A particular prayer , ie. for someone who has strayed from the truth and if our prayer brings that person back to the Lord, then it means that a soul has been saved from death.
If we pray for friends on Facebook, it is just so easy to type " praying", but don we actually set the time aside to do so?
We go to Confession and confess our sins to our Priest, but have we thought about confessing our sings to one another and pray for one another for the healing of our souls.


On this night, let us ask God to grant us constancy and/or perseverance in prayer ( Saint Luke 11, verses 5-13)


Amen.


Father Ed Bakker
Anglican Catholic Church / Original Province
Mission of Saint Aidan of Lindisfarne
Launceston
Tasmania
Australia





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